It's So Miami!

Miami is one of the state's – and the world’s – most popular vacation spots. Though destinations often are said to offer something for everyone, the Miami area does indeed offer multiple enticements for everyone:

- The trendy nightlife of South Beach, bejeweled by the eye candy of the Art Deco district.

- The bustle of Calle Ocho and the highly caffeinated energy of Little Havana.

- The plush hotels of Miami Beach and the historic hideaways of Coral Gables.

Seemingly endless shopping opportunities in modern, sprawling malls and the quiet, personal attention offered by the family-owned shops of Coconut Grove and many other corners of the region. The lures of deep-sea fishing and golf and tennis. Miami's major league football, basketball, hockey and baseball. Boat shows and auto racing. Art festivals and outdoor food and wine extravaganzas. An international airport and the world’s busiest cruise port.

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The best beach for people watching is world-famous South Beach, the historic Miami Beach of postcards and television fame. This is also a popular beach for surfers, who head out on their boards between 1st and 5th Streets. Grab something to eat at the sidewalk cafes that line the area and head over to the open water for a visit to Miami’s wildest beach.

  • Wear sunscreen. It gets really hot and bright

 

  • Don’t take your valuables to the beach

 

Beautiful places where you can enjoy your favorite game.

Greater Miami has plenty to brag about when it comes to golf courses. We feature some of the most difficult courses in the world, and some courses have been rated in the top 10 courses by Golfweek. With courses as impressive as those, it's little wonder that a number of great professional golf tournaments call our city home.

 

We even have the only public Miami Beach golf course in the Continental U.S. utilizing Paspalum grass. April is Miami Golf Month, with special offers at our renowned golf resorts and courses.

 

 

Greater Miami & the Beaches is home to one of four World Golf Championship events, the CA Championship at Doral, which features the top 50 players from the Official World Golf Ranking along with top finishers on the money lists of the six Tours comprising the International Federation of PGA Tours (PGA TOUR, European Tour, Australasian Tour, Japan Golf Tour, Asian Tour and Sunshine Tour).

Fore! Look out golfers, you’ve found Golf Paradise. Home to PGA events, world class golf courses with perfectly maintained greens and absolutely unrivaled views, Miami is a world-class golf trip. Did we mention you can play all year long? What are you waiting for?

 

If you enjoy golf, there’s nothing quite like teeing off on the TPC Blue Monster at Doral, one of the nation’s most challenging courses.

You can walk in the steps of PGA pros Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson, Ernie Els and Nick Watney, who have won World Golf Championships-Cadillac Championships at the Doral Golf Resort & Spa, a Marriott Resort. It’s a memorable golfing experience that happens only in Greater Miami and the Beaches.

 

 

But even if you’re not quite ready for the Blue Monster, there are plenty of other courses to enjoy regardless of skill level. From Aventura, Miami Lakes and Miami Beach to Coral Gables, Homestead and Doral, Greater Miami has more than 20 public courses.

 

If you need shoes and cleats, balls or tees, the region has plenty of well-stocked golf stores. There are also many private instructors and driving ranges that can help you improve your game.

 

The City of Miami Beach maintains many of the parks that visitors recognize. Lummus Park provides the palm trees and sand dunes that connect the sparkling blue Atlantic with the pastel-colored Ocean Drive. Lummus is the image on nearly every postcard, backed up by Art Deco hotels, fashion models and fancy cars. 

The City of Miami Beach maintains many of the parks that visitors recognize. Lummus Park provides the palm trees and sand dunes that connect the sparkling blue Atlantic with the pastel-colored Ocean Drive. Lummus is the image on nearly every postcard, backed up by Art Deco hotels, fashion models and fancy cars. 

 

 

South Pointe Park makes a great perch from which to view giant cruise ships, nearly close enough to touch, as they glide out from the port each evening. Miami Beach Botanical Garden is a pleasant enclave across the street from the Miami Beach Convention Center.

 

 

In Downtown Miami, small neighborhood parks dot many of the areas popular with visitors. The native hardwood hammocks of Simpson Park await just three blocks from the bustling business center of Brickell Avenue. Wainwright, David Kennedy and Peacock parks line the bay at Coconut Grove.

A pleasant drive south of Miami, Pinecrest Gardens lays out 22 beautiful acres of botanic gardens with a thousand varieties of exotic plants, palms and trees, in a setting of native hardwoods, flowing streams and historic structures. The gardens feature a petting zoo, playground, butterfly exhibit, and facilities for weddings, parties and concerts.

 

 

Amid the natural beauty here is the newly upgraded Banyan Bowl, a 500-seat outdoor amphitheater with amazing acoustics and lighting for performances by orchestras, bands and theater companies.

 

A seasonal series called Jazz at Pinecrest Gardens, with heavy talent and light fare, presents the perfect musical genre for this intimate venue.Back in the 1930s, an avian attraction was conceived where birds could fly free instead of in cages.

 

 

When the original Parrot Jungle moved and morphed into Jungle Island, the village of Pinecrest purchased this beloved site and in 2003 made it a park.

 

Large parks also abound in Greater Miami and the Beaches. Up the coast, Haulover Park is the site of endless waterfront activity,

 

The road starts at South Pointe just south of 1st Street, near the southernmost end of the main barrier island of Miami Beach, about a quarter mile west of the Atlantic Ocean. Ocean Drive continues north to 15th Street, immediately southeast of Lincoln Road.

It is known for its Art Deco hotels.

The road starts at South Pointe just south of 1st Street, near the southernmost end of the main barrier island of Miami Beach, about a quarter mile west of the Atlantic Ocean. Ocean Drive continues north to 15th Street, immediately southeast of Lincoln Road.

It is known for its Art Deco hotels.

 

Ocean Drive is also the location of the famed Versace mansion, one of the most photographed houses in North America. The street is the center of the Miami Art Deco District, which is home to about 800 preserved buildings. Streamline Moderne evolved from the Art Deco style, and dominates the street. The street has a magazine named after it, Ocean Drive magazine.

 

Miami Beach is known for its high-octane nightlife. Whatever your night-owl needs are, there’s an area that caters to your style, beverage choice, music taste and desired atmosphere. There’s the glitz and glam of South Beach’s world famous clubs, lounges and bars.

On South Beach, you can expect the swanky club-feel of well-heeled, international partiers and world-class DJs with swaying fans. It’s all part of the South Beach club vibe that’s made the town famous for partying.

 

The South Beach club scene is still going strong. Currently, there’s an influx of electronic music influence making its way over from the European club scene, but Miami has long been a generator of electronic music influence because of the yearly internationally acclaimed Ultra Music Festival and Winter Music Conference.

 

Clubs here run the gamut from live music hole-in-the-wall to mega structures with rooms and rooms of different music. Check out LIV at the Fontainebleau, Mansion or Set for a taste of the long-standing staples on the South Beach club scene. Amnesia is another hotspot. This multi-level, all-white space is bound to keep you dancing all night long.

 

If clubbing isn’t quite your jams, South Beach has more popping late night hangouts of all kinds. Try a low key beer room or a hotel cocktail lounge at B Bar at The Betsy or The Catalina. Enjoy music at a poolside bar at The SLS, The Standard The Raleigh or the Delano.

 

Lincoln Road, or more accurately, Lincoln Road Mall, is an 8-block long pedestrian walkway between  Washington Avenue and Alton Road, filled with shops, restaurants, cafes all in the art deco and mediterranean styles found throughout South Beach, and fabulous botantical plantings and water gardens. It, along with Ocean Drive, is one of the 2 main destinations  for visitors to Miami Beach/South Beach.

Lincoln Road, or more accurately, Lincoln Road Mall, is an 8-block long pedestrian walkway between  Washington Avenue and Alton Road, filled with shops, restaurants, cafes all in the art deco and mediterranean styles found throughout South Beach, and fabulous botantical plantings and water gardens. It, along with Ocean Drive, is one of the 2 main destinations  for visitors to Miami Beach/South Beach.

 

Lincoln Road Mall was born. Over the decades since then, Lincoln Road Mall has become ever more fashionable, the place to shop, eat, drink and people watch.

 

 

In 2010, two major buildings were built immediately adjacent to Lincoln Road Mall: Frank Gehry's New World Symphony campus and park and, and att the other end, the "1111 Lincoln Road" parking installation by the famed Swiss design firm of Herzog and De Mueron, further enhancing the architectural interest of Lincoln Road.

 

At one time Lincoln Road was Miami Beach's top commercial area, with shops, nightclubs, bars, and department stores lining both sides of the street from the Atlantic Ocean all the way to Biscayne Bay. Saks Fifth Avenue, Harry Winston Jewelers, and Bonwit-Teller all were there for wealthy resort hotel guests to visit. 

 

 

The Road had no less than five movie theaters within its ten block span, including the world famous Carib Theater, with its live parrots in the lobby and mechanical roof that retracted to allow patrons to view feature films under a moonlit Miami Beach sky. 

 

 

Wealthy vacationers from the north would often arrive in Miami Beach for the winter season sporting empty steamer trunks to be used to transport their purchases back home again in April. Most of those purchases were made in the stores on Lincoln Road.

 

 

In an attempt to reverse the economic hardship being suffered by local stores and restaurants, the city commissioned famed Miami Beach architect Morris Lapidus, designer of the Fontainebleau Hotel, to transform Lincoln Road into a pedestrian shopping mall in 1960

 

Fun is the name of the game in Greater Miami and the Beaches. We’ve got great weather, sandy beaches and plenty of cool stuff to do all year long. Families will find a treasure chest full of activities: swimming, beach games, camping adventures, nature hikes, museum hopping and more.

Fun is the name of the game in Greater Miami and the Beaches. We’ve got great weather, sandy beaches and plenty of cool stuff to do all year long. Families will find a treasure chest full of activities: swimming, beach games, camping adventures, nature hikes, museum hopping and more.

 

Miami is known for its amazing attractions.While you should definitely schedule a day for beach loafing, you should also be sure to plan ahead to check out the broader tourism scene. Just imagine, in one day you could catch some early morning sun at the beach, then head down the Everglades and visit a real working alligator farm where 2,000 alligators of all sizes live in natural settings at Everglades Alligator Farm.

 

Not into giant native reptiles? The options are endless. Maybe you’re thinking something more like a tour of a mansion with more than two thousand years of lifestyle artifacts? Well, you’re in luck because we have that too at Vizcaya Museum & Gardens.

At one time Lincoln Road was Miami Beach's top commercial area, with shops, nightclubs, bars, and department stores lining both sides of the street from the Atlantic Ocean all the way to Biscayne Bay. Saks Fifth Avenue, Harry Winston Jewelers, and Bonwit-Teller all were there for wealthy resort hotel guests to visit. 

 

 

The Road had no less than five movie theaters within its ten block span, including the world famous Carib Theater, with its live parrots in the lobby and mechanical roof that retracted to allow patrons to view feature films under a moonlit Miami Beach sky. 

 

 

Wealthy vacationers from the north would often arrive in Miami Beach for the winter season sporting empty steamer trunks to be used to transport their purchases back home again in April. Most of those purchases were made in the stores on Lincoln Road.

 

 

In an attempt to reverse the economic hardship being suffered by local stores and restaurants, the city commissioned famed Miami Beach architect Morris Lapidus, designer of the Fontainebleau Hotel, to transform Lincoln Road into a pedestrian shopping mall in 1960.

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